Nicolas Jenson's typesetting of Marcellus' Compendiosa Doctrina. Victoria & Albert Museum: one of many interesting distractions to be found there.

Still here…

…but gone a bit quiet on the blogging front.  And that is despite some wonderful things to write about: the tremendous Bruckner 7 from Haitink and the LSO; Orphée et Eurydice in an inventive staging at Covent Garden; a beautifully crafted Strauss evening from the Leipzigers and Chailly; and the intimacy of Rossi’s Orpheus at the Sam Wanamaker… 

Nicolas Jenson's typesetting of Marcellus' Compendiosa Doctrina. Victoria & Albert Museum: one of many interesting distractions to be found there.

My quick snap of Nicolas Jenson’s beautifully crisp typesetting of Compendiosa Doctrina by Nonius Marcellus. At the Victoria & Albert Museum: one of many interesting distractions I found there last weekend on a spontaneous mooch around the galleries.

Where is the time to set down some half-coherent thoughts? Or maybe it’s not about having time in the strict sense, perhaps more about the inclination: with things being quite intense for five days a week, I find I have less mental space for concentrating on writing about music. One of the ways in which music is a fantastic antidote to the pressures of a heavy work week – as evidenced at a rollicking good Mahler 5 from the LPO and Saraste on one midweek day last week – is that you can be simply ‘in the moment’. Having pushed myself to pursue out-of-work interests that require sustained concentration, or which necessitate a degree of planning in order to meet various commitments, I’m now beginning to regain a sense of the importance of just enjoying things for right here, right now. That might be influenced by having recently attended the funeral of a friend, a lovely genuine, immediately engaging woman who died at a terribly young 48. Music (whether live or in recording), or mooching about in museums, going for a walk, going to the gym, being daft with a glass or two of wine and good company: they are all about being nowhere but where you are right then and there, soaking up, experiencing and shaping the immediate moment.

The future’s important; the present is beginning to feel increasingly precious.

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